Landscape Photos of Little Round Top, Gettysburg

Pretty much the only thing that you need to take great photos of Little Round Top is good weather. This article offers a small sampling of photos both around and on Little Round Top, the southern terminus of Cemetery Ridge and the left anchor of the Union line at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2–3, 1863.

For a map by the American Battlefield Trust that shows battlefield action in at Little Round Top, click here. Or to read Civil War Cycling’s dense but detailed study notes for Day 2 Gettysburg, click here and look under the Detailed Summary for “The Contest for Little Round Top.”

West Side of Little Round Top

photos of Little Round Top, west face
View of Little Round Top from Devil’s Den

Photos of Little Round Top as Part of Cemetery Ridge

In both of the following photos, you can see a bronze portrait statue of Union Brig. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac. Warren noticed that Gen. Sickles had left his assigned position near Little Round Top to advance to higher ground near Emmitsburg Road at the Sherfy peach orchard. The army flank thus exposed, Warren and others scrambled to meet the inevitable threat: Confederates from Alabama and Texas would (and did) attack Little Round Top.

photos of Little Round Top, west slope looking north
On Little Round Top, Looking North Along Cemetery Ridge
photos of Little Round Top, west slope looking south
On Little Round Top, Looking South to Gouverneur K. Warren Statue

Views of Devil’s Den from Little Round Top

looking from Little Round Top to Devil's Den
View Looking Northwest from Little Round Top Toward The Valley of Death
Devil's Den
View Looking Southwest from Little Round Top Toward Devil’s Den

Other Photos of Little Round Top

20th Maine Monument
20th Maine Monument on Southeast Side of Little Round Top
Path to 20th Maine Monument
Walking Path to 20th Maine Monument

The 44th and 12th New York Infantry Monument stands on Little Round Top at the south end of Cemetery Ridge. The army’s Chief of Staff, Maj. Gen. Daniel Butterfield, designed the monument (also known as “The Castle”). This largest and most expensive regimental monument at Gettysburg National Military Park, the structure was dedicated on the 30th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

44th and 12th New York Infantry Monument
44th and 12th New York Infantry Monument

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